Radioactive dating christian perspective

For since the fathers fell asleep, all things continue as they were from the beginning of creation.” Unfortunately for the secularist, there are serious problems with the uniformitarian view as it is applied to radioactive dating.

Recent experimental evidences verify that the decay rates of radioisotopes can vary significantly from the currently accepted values—by as much as 10 These conditions could have easily existed during the Flood.

Less common modes of decay are direct emission of a neutron or proton, double-beta decay, and spontaneous fission.

As with alpha decay, these modes are generally observed in the heavier radionuclides with a few exceptions such as He (neutron emission).

It is the differing number of neutrons that give rise to stable and unstable isotopes (radioisotopes) within a given elemental family.

As it turns out, nearly every element from Hydrogen (Z=1) to Bismuth (Z=83) has at least one stable isotope, with Technetium (Z=43) and Promethium (Z=61) as the exceptions.

Unfortunately for the secularist, there are radiohalos formed from what appears to be primordial Po (polonium), rather than Po in the form of daughter isotopes from U decay.

This perspective, generally termed the uniformitarian view of nature, constitutes a pillar of the secularist’s worldview and is fundamental in generating the concept of deep time in the origins discussion.

The Bible defines this view well in 2 Peter 3:3-4: …knowing this first: that scoffers will come in the last days, walking according to their own lusts, and saying, “Where is the promise of His coming?

This makes energy spectroscopy for these decays more challenging than for alpha or gamma decays.

If the parent nucleus decays to an excited state of the daughter nucleus for any of the above decays, then gamma rays can also accompany the emitted particles.